Who gives this snow? (My son’s account) 「誰が雪を降らせるか」―長男の話(英語)

My older son was very excited to see the snow falling down today. He kept saying aloud, “I love snowy days, ’cause I get to make snow men and play outside!” with his twinkling eyes. He just could not wait to go outside to taste the first snow (It was the second snow in the season, but today was a real “snowy” day.)

On the contrary, I am usually reluctant to go outside in the cold weather, especially after spending a warm Christmas in the Canary islands! Then he added, “Mama, we did not put that last plant in the pot yet! I told the dried plant to hang in there and prayed that it would come back again the other day. We gotta put it inside!”
That did it. How could I possibly resist this? So, I right away put on my and younger son’s winter atire! Of course, my two sons were happy to feel the wonder of snow.

When he came in to warm ourselves with a cup of coco after digging the icy ground and having some garden walk/play, my older son seemed content, looked at the snow for a quite some time and said:
“Do you know who gives this snow?”
“No. Who?”
“It is Kami-sama (god or creator in general in Japanese)! It says, down here is the snow. Then it falls down from the clouds. Then, for rain, it says, “Take the rain from the Elbe river.” Then the water comes up and then goes down as rain. For warm places, it says, come and shine. Then sun comes and warm up these places.”
“Hmmmm….Is that so?”
Again I had to look at him with a surprise. My husband and I, who did not grow up with a specific religion, had not really passed on a specific teaching except talking about many stories. Yet he has such a firm idea in these creations.

“I like the snowy days because they give quietness like this…”
I continued. We looked at the snow together for some time. It sure looks graceful and calming.

I felt moved by an awe of wonder that he can find in daly life. How nice to be able to see the world in this way! If we adults can see the sacredness in everything in our lives as children can (as once we did), we are always uplifted in every moment. I sense this pure sacredness that we can see in everything or every being (including ourselves) is the basis of any spiritual path. Don’t children always teach us in a very simple manner yet a very profound way? It made me humble.

After our friend’s birthday party today, my older son said in a sleepy withering voice in the car, “Is the snow something I can have even after my brushing teeth like water and tea?” He still wanted to try the snow :)

To awe we all see and have inside,
Sat Nam,
Aya Ek Ong Kar K.

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